October 10, 2010

The Semantic Web has enormous potential to change the way we receive, understand and use information. The Web as we know it today connects pages of information one dimension at a time to each other based on some simple things you ask it to perform (e.g. keywords like “dog” & “food”). Of course you get some pages that talk about dog food. But many others that simply happen to have the words dog and food somewhere on the page yet talk about all kinds of things other than “dog food.” A Semantic Web makes sure the concept of dog food is present first, and then identifies other facts, experts, types, uses, recipes, ingredients, etc., about dog food. A Semantic Web is smart in that it presents a better set of results, in context and is ready to solve problems, answer questions directly, infer, resolve, discover and analyze in ways that the current web was never designed to do.

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juansequeda's picture
August 17, 2010

Personally, I believe that the Semantic Web will become mainstream in the next few years (I actually have a bet on this with some college friends). I know that this is a strong statement, but I am confident that it will happen. Mainstream is defined in Wikipedia as “the common current of thought of the majority”. Furthermore it states that something is mainstream if it “is available to the general public” and it “has ties to corporate or commercial entities. However, how do you evaluate if something is on the verge of becoming mainstream? I propose the following metric:  inclusion at the South by South West (SXSW) Conference!
 

juansequeda's picture
June 18, 2010

In order for the Semantic Web to become a reality and success, there needs to be data on the web published as Linked Data. However, data on the web is not a new thing. People have been publishing raw data for a long time as XML, CSV or even spreadsheets. Data can also be accessed through APIs.  But where does most of the data on the web come from? Relational Databases!

bsletten's picture
June 11, 2010

The first of four articles about Semantic Universe joining the Linked Data cloud.

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10.07.10 |

The Semantic Web has enormous potential to change the way we receive, understand and use information. The Web as we know it today connects pages of information one dimension at a time to each other based on some simple things you ask it to perform (e.g. keywords like “dog” & “food”). Of course you get some pages that talk about dog food. But many others that simply happen to have the words dog and food somewhere on the page yet talk about all kinds of things other than “dog food.” A Semantic Web makes sure the concept of dog food is present first, and then identifies other facts, experts, types, uses, recipes, ingredients, etc., about dog food. A Semantic Web is smart in that it presents a better set of results, in context and is ready to solve problems, answer questions directly, infer, resolve, discover and analyze in ways that the current web was never designed to do.

06.28.10 |

In September 2009, the W3C elevated the Protocol for Web Description Resources (POWDER) artifacts to a Recommendation.  POWDER is a great bonus to the Semantic Web and to the larger Internet in general.  But what is the specification all about?  And why don’t we seem to hear more about it along with RDF and OWL?  This article will get you up-to-speed with what you need to know about POWDER.

06.22.10 |

With just about every major brand and celebrity on Facebook and Twitter, the line between social media and popular culture is becoming harder to distinguish by the day. What is evident is the incredible power social media has in uncovering popular sentiment… 

06.17.10 |

Tony Shaw: Hi Olly, so to get us started, could you give me a high-level overview of what Atigeo does?

Olly Downs: Absolutely. Atigeo’s platform, xPatterns, enables enterprises to derive insights from large, disparate sources of unstructured data. In doing so, we’ve taken two approaches toward how our platform is productized. The first approach is around aspects of our core technology, which allows us to build simple ontologies for domains of unstructured data and then act upon the understanding of the data – in response to queries or profiles of entities, for example. The second aspect of our product enables enterprises to provide customers the ability to access and manage their profile or persona.

06.15.10 |

How do we roll out the Semantic Web? Paradoxically, the fast track may involve getting help from billions of people who know nothing about the Semantic Web and have no interest in it.

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